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PATIENTS' STORIES

We are very proud to share with you what our patients say about Meadowlands Hospital... readmore

“I had such a great experience at the Meadowlands Hospital! From ER Registration to nurses, anesthesiologist to my doctor – everyone was very professional and nice but most importantly caring! This is what makes this hospital great!"
— Emma R., Meadowlands Hospital Same Day Surgery Patient, May 2017

“MHMC Staff made me feel comfortable and at ease at all times. Nurses always made sure my bed was made and cleaned. I never knew hospital food could be so good. Great meals! Nurses were helpful – amazing staff. For my first C-section, there is no way I could have done it without my nurses. Thank you. Nurses made sure I was in no pain and kept up with me as much as possible. Everyone was friendly and polite. Staff made me feel like family and they honestly cared. At first I was very nervous because it was my first time in this hospital – after my experience I will recommend this hospital to everyone. One of the best hospitals I have ever been to – please keep up the good work!”
— Amanda R., Meadowlands Hospital HCAHPS/Postpartum Patient, February 2017

MEADOWLANDS EMERGENCY

MHMC HEALTHFEED

Anesthesia

Anesthesia traditionally meant the condition of having sensation (including the feeling of pain) blocked or temporarily taken away. It is a pharmacologically induced and reversible state of amnesia, analgesia, loss of responsiveness, loss of skeletal muscle reflexes or decreased stress response, or all simultaneously. This allows patients to undergo surgery and other procedures without the distress and pain they would otherwise experience. An alternative definition is a "reversible lack of awareness," including a total lack of awareness (e.g. a general anesthetic) or a lack of awareness of a part of the body such as a spinal anesthetic.

Types of anesthesia include local anesthesia, regional anesthesia, general anesthesia, and dissociative anesthesia. Local anesthesia inhibits sensory perception within a specific location on the body, such as a tooth or the urinary bladder. Regional anesthesia renders a larger area of the body insensate by blocking transmission of nerve impulses between a part of the body and the spinal cord. Two frequently used types of regional anesthesia are spinal anesthesia and epidural anesthesia. General anesthesia refers to inhibition of sensory, motor and sympathetic nerve transmission at the level of the brain, resulting in unconsciousness and lack of sensation. Dissociative anesthesia uses agents that inhibit transmission of nerve impulses between higher centers of the brain (such as the cerebral cortex) and the lower centers, such as those found within the limbic system.